The Obesity Code aims to clear up myths on weight loss, and provide a simple formula for long term success. Below I’ll discuss aspects from the book, including an example diet plan at the bottom.

Since writing The Obesity Code Jason has followed up with The Diabetes Code (aimed at helping people prevent or reverse type 2 diabetes), and The Complete Guide to Fasting (which covers intermittent and extended fast details).

Jason Fung – Author of The Obesity Code

Hormonal Roots of Obesity

Jason suggests that to understand weight loss requires understanding the hormonal roots of obesity. He explains that the hormone insulin is the key driver of obesity. Therefore obesity is a hormonal, not a caloric imbalance. He recommends we focus on two key areas:

  • What to eat
  • When to eat

What to Eat & What Not to Eat

What to Eat?

The book doesn’t tell you specifically each and every food you should eat. Instead Jason outlines some general principles for eating:

  • Reduce intake of refined grains and sugars
  • Moderate protein consumption
  • Increase natural fats
  • Maximize protective factors such as fiber and vinegar
  • Choose only natural, unprocessed foods.

What Not to Eat?

Jason mentions a few specific examples of what not to eat:

  • Sugar – Don’t add it to anything you eat or drink. Check food & drink labels to ensure sugar hasn’t been added to anything you buy. See below for other common names of sugar*.
  • Snacks – Jason recommends you cut out all snacks between meals. Constant stimulation of insulin leads to insulin insensitivity.
  • Sauces – Barbecue, plum, honey garlic, hoisin, sweet & sour and other dipping sauces contain large amounts of sugar. As do commercial salad dressings and ketchup.
  • Candy – It probably goes without saying that chocolate and sweets should be avoided completely (except for dark chocolate that’s 70% cacao content or greater).
  • Desserts – these are generally high in sugar and should be avoided. Replace with seasonal fruits (optionally with whipped cream) or dark chocolate. Save less healthy desserts for special occasions, but don’t make them a regular occurrence.

*Other common names for sugar are sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltose, dextrose, molasses, hydrolyzed starch, honey, inverted sugar, cane sugar, glucose-fructose, high fructose corn syrup, brown sugar, corn sweetener, rice/corn/cane/maple/malt/golden/palm syrup and agave nectar. Don’t let manufacturers trick you into consuming excess sugar under the guise of a different name.

Then in regards to the highly glycemic, popular staples; bread, pasta, potatoes and cereals

Bread & Pasta – Jason suggests the consumption of bread and pasta should be minimized for a number of reasons:

  • Low nutritional value (processing removes most fibre and vitamins)
  • High glycemic effect (big increase in blood glucose level, which then requires a spike in insulin to regulate it)
  • Easy to over consume & may be addictive

Rice – Jason notes that many Asian populations have eaten diets based on highly refined white, polished, rice. Yet, until recently, obesity and diabetes remained rare in these populations. It has only been since they added sugars and processed foods to their diet, that obesity and diabetes have become rampant. This shows us that it’s possible to consume white rice and stay healthy. However, for those looking to lose weight, white rice is highly glycemic, and should be minimized.

Potatoes – Jason notes that potatoes are highly glycemic and consumption should be minimized. He does however point out that potatoes served cold and dressed with vinegar as a salad had 43% lower glycemic index1 – in part due to the cold increasing the resistant starch content of the potatoes.

Cereals – Jason has two main messages for breakfast. The first is that it shouldn’t be considered “the most important meal of the day”. If you’re hungry in the morning, and want to eat; do. But if you’re not, and instead want to break your fast at midday with grilled salmon and a side salad, then that’s perfectly acceptable. Jason’s second message is that many breakfast foods such as cereals, breads, muffins, Danish pastries etc. are highly problematic, and should be avoided. If you must eat cereals, he says, eat those containing less than 0.8 of a teaspoon (4 grams) of sugar per serving.

Foods Jason Specifically Recommends:

  • Eggs – Inaccurately demonized due to cholesterol concerns, eggs are in fact incredibly healthy. They can be enjoyed in many ways, including scrambled, over easy, sunny side up, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, poached, etc.
  • Seasonal fruits in moderation
  • Traditional yogurt and Greek yogurt. Make sure they are sugar-free.
  • Oatmeal – whole and steel-cut are good. Avoid instant oats which often add sugar.
  • Nuts – Macadamia, cashews, walnuts and pistachios are all high in healthy monounsaturated fats and low in carbohydrates. Watch out for peanuts, which aren’t technically a nut (they are legumes) and should be consumed in moderation.
  • Coffee & Tea. Avoid adding sugar or sweeteners. Cinnamon or other natural spices can be used to enhance the flavor.
  • Wine – moderate consumption of red wine (up to 2 glasses per day) typically does not impair insulin sensitivity, and therefore may be enjoyed.
  • Bone broth. See below for more details on bone broths.

(Note: this list of foods Jason recommends in Obesity Code is not exhaustive, for example it doesn’t mention things like meat and fish, which Jason is a proponent of. You can reasonably assume that if food is natural, unprocessed and consumed in moderation; it’s ok for Jason’s diet protocol).

 

The hormonal obesity cycle – showing the effects of excess glucose and fructose (image via IDM program)

When to Eat

  • Balance insulin-dominant periods with insulin-deficient periods (balancing feeding & fasting). Eating continuously is a recipe for weight gain
  • Intermittent fasting is a very effective way to deal with when to eat

Sleep

Beyond what to eat & when to eat, Jason touches on another factor that affects insulin levels; sleep. Not only does sleep affect insulin sensitivity, it also affects our ability to self-control, and our desire for carbohydrates (increased grehlin levels, which is a hormone responsible for hunger signalling). Thus people who are chronically sleep deprived will often (through no fault of their own), make more impulsive food decisions, and crave more carbohydrates. Therefore its important that if sleep deprivation is a factor, it gets tackled alongside the dietary choices.

This image shows the difference in insulin secretion between a diet with no snacking, and a diet where food is constantly consumed. Insulin = energy storage. Therefore you want to have decent breaks in insulin secretion for a healthy body.

Sample 7-Day Meal Plan – 24-hour Fasting Protocol

The below meal plan effectively means that every other day you are partially fasting from dinner through to dinner (24 hours). To make this slightly more do-able, Jason suggests incorporating a cup of vegetable, chicken or beef broth in place of where lunch would be.

Treat the exact contents of the meals as guidelines only, to be tweaked to your own taste. If you need to increase the quantities of food to reach satiety, do so. As long as when you’re fasting, you stick to it.

You may notice that only 3 of the 7 days include a dessert for dinner – this seems to be Jason’s way of explaining that sweet foods should be an occasional treat, rather than consumed daily.

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Breakfast FAST DAY
Water
Coffee
Western omelet
Green apple
FAST DAY
Water
Coffee
All-Bran Buds with milk
Mixed berries
FAST DAY
Water
Coffee
Two eggs
Breakfast sausage/bacon
Strawberries
FAST DAY
Water
Coffee
Lunch FAST DAY
Water
Green tea
1 cup of vegetable broth
Arugula salad with walnuts, slices of pear, goat cheese FAST DAY
Water
Green tea
1 cup of chicken broth
Ginger chicken lettuce cups
Stir-fried vegetables
FAST DAY
Water
Green tea
1 cup of beef broth
Baby spinach and lentil salad FAST DAY
Water
Green tea
1 cup of vegetable broth
Dinner Herbed chicken
Green beans
Mixed berries for dessert
Asian grilled pork belly
Baby bok choy stir-fry
No dessert
Halibut pan-fried in butter and coconut oil
No dessert
Indian chicken curry
Cauliflower
Green salad
No dessert
Baked catfish
Sautéed broccoli with garlic and olive oil
Seasonal fruits for dessert
Peppered steak
Asparagus
Grilled chicken salad
Dark chocolate for dessert

Note: On mobile devices, you may need to scroll right to read the full table.

In case it’s of use, I’ve made a PDF version of the above table so you can print it out. Additionally I’ve made a second version with empty spaces for the meals, that way you can program your own meal details:

Sample 7-Day Meal Plan – 36-hour Fasting Protocol

This version differs from the above, in that rather than fasting from dinner through to dinner every other day, you fast from dinner through a whole day, until breakfast 2 days later (again, repeating the fast every other day).

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Breakfast FAST DAY
Water
Coffee
Western omelet
Green apple
FAST DAY
Water
Coffee
All-Bran Buds with milk
Mixed berries
FAST DAY
Water
Coffee
Two eggs
Breakfast sausage/bacon
Strawberries
FAST DAY
Water
Coffee
Lunch FAST DAY
Water
Green tea
1 cup of vegetable broth
Arugula salad with walnuts, slices of pear, goat cheese FAST DAY
Water
Green tea
1 cup of chicken broth
Ginger chicken lettuce cups
Stir-fried vegetables
FAST DAY
Water
1 cup of beef broth
Baby spinach and lentil salad FAST DAY
Water
1 cup of vegetable broth
Dinner FAST DAY
Water
Green Tea
No dessert
Asian grilled pork belly
Baby bok choy stir-fry
No dessert
FAST DAY
Water
Green Tea
No dessert
Indian chicken curry
Cauliflower
Green salad
No dessert
FAST DAY
Water
Green tea
Seasonal fruits
Peppered steak
Asparagus
No dessert
FAST DAY
Water
Green tea
No dessert

Note: On mobile devices, you may need to scroll right to read the full table.

Bone Broth

A core aspect of Jason’s diet regimen is the consumption of bone broth on days when fasting. There are a few key benefits to this:

  • Its low in calories and almost zero carbohydrates, thus not impacting significantly on the health benefits of abstaining from food
  • Its high in amino acids such as proline, arginine and glycine, as well as minerals such as calcium, magnesium and phosphorus
  • The salt and minerals help with staying adequately hydrated during the fast

Vegetarians – The substitute to a bone broth would be a vegetable broth. So you’d essentially just cook a vegetable soup (without blending), then strain the vegetables and leave the low carb, tasty wholesome broth.

Simple Bone Broth Recipe

At its core bone broth is very easy to make, it’s essentially the simmering of bones for 12+ hours. If any complexity creeps in, its in the sourcing of good bones, and then the additional ingredients that add to the flavour. These are the key things you need to begin:

  • Having a slow cooker (aka crock-pot) is ideal – but if you’re cooking on the stove, you just need to make sure you have a large pot
  • Sieve or strainer at the end to separate bones from the broth
  • Chicken or beef bones
  • 1 tablespoon of vinegar to help extract the bones nutrients (Apple cider vinegar is a healthy choice)
  • Sea salt (or pink Himalayan salt) to taste
  • (optional) Additional seasoning and vegetables, to taste

If you’re cooking a chicken broth, perhaps the simplest way to acquire the bones is to purchase an (ideally organic) chicken. Cook it and first use it for the meat, then when finished, use it for your broth.

When you’re packing the chicken into your pot, its beneficial to crack some of the bones to let out more flavour and nutrients. This can be done by pushing down on the carcass until you hear cracks, alternatively some people go as far as to individually crack the bones with some scissors.

For a beef broth, it’s generally easy enough to source bones from a local butcher or market. Ideally grass fed cow bones, although this pushes the price up. That said, one of the core benefits of grass fed beef is the quality of fat (e.g. omega3 to omega-6 ratio) obtained, which doesn’t apply to bones so much.

N.B. Having a little meat left on the bones is a non-issue, given that you’ll be straining the contents at the end.

Bone Broth Cooking Steps

  • Place bones in a pot
  • Add a tablespoon of vinegar (to help bring out the nutrients)
  • Season with salt, and optional extras like pepper or herbs
  • Cover with water
  • Bring to the boil, then reduce heat until simmering
  • Initially there may be some fat build up on the surface, which can be skimmed off
  • For chicken bones, cooking overnight is often enough time, up to 24h is not uncommon
  • For beef bones, overnight is possible, but due to being stronger than chicken bones, beef often needs a bit longer (say 24 hours)
  • When finished, strain the broth into containers
  • Let cool and then refrigerate or freeze what you don’t plan to immediately consume

See YouTube for a good beef broth example video and a good chicken broth example video.

Shop Bought Bone Broth

Whilst shop bought bone broths generally aren’t as good, or nutritious as a home made broth, they’re a good option when time is limited. Especially when the core focus here is to adhere to the fasting protocol itself. The bone broths are just a component of the overall plan.

Two off the shelf broths with good reviews are Pacific Organic Chicken Broth & Kettle & Fire Beef Broth. Pacific’s version is more affordable, but has a bit less marketing hype behind it.

The above is just a tiny snapshot of Jason’s book. The full thing contains vastly more content, including discussion of:

  • Disease prevention
  • Tips for fasting and intermittent fasting
  • + more!

You can find the full version of The Obesity Code on Amazon.com, along with Jason’s other bestsellers’ The Diabetes Code and The Complete Guide to Fasting.

To discuss the Obesity Code Diet further, you can join this Facebook Group.

.

See Post Sources Below:

  1. Vinegar dressing and cold storage of potatoes lowers postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses in healthy subjects – Leeman M (2005)
John Alexander

Posted by John Alexander

Note: Not a Medical Doctor or PhD. I'm a researcher and writer, with a focus on the subjects of health and longevity. My intent is to write about scientific research in an accessible, understandable way. If you believe something I've stated needs a reference, and I haven't done so, please let me know in the comments. Follow on: Twitter

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Julia
Julia
2 months ago

Hi John,

Are you familiar with HUEL Black Edition? I am thinking of using this and starting fasting, as I am vegan so wouldn’t be able to follow much of the food planning is quite meat and dairy heavy. I am really glad to have found this as have always thought small and regular eating was best!! Now I know where i’ve probably been going wrong all my life ha!

Molten Pixie
Molten Pixie
3 months ago

Thank you so much for this, I have the audio book, but the word insulin resistance seems to send me to sleep and I keep missing bits. Grateful for this summary.

Tiffany
Tiffany
4 months ago

Please clarify time frames for me please. If I am doing a 24 hour fast and I eat dinner at 5pm, I break my fast 24 hours later at 5pm. Is this correct?

Tina
Tina
4 months ago

Hi, I am new to this and found lots of positive about the fasting. I am 5ft 1inch and 89kg. I know I have to lose weight. What is the best way to do? to start 24hrs fasting or 36hrs or any other. I don’t have any health issues at the moment but desperate lose more weight. Thanks

Tina
Tina
Reply to  John Alexander
4 months ago

Thank you.

Jessica
Jessica
6 months ago

What happens when you reach your goal weight? Do you decrease your fasting days?

Sumi Fox
Sumi Fox
7 months ago

Does Dr. Fung ever talk about diet recommendations for people who exercise? For example, I lift weights 2x week and hot yoga 3-4x a week- would I fast on non-workout days then? Additionally I could not be satiated from the prescribed meal plan if that is what I ate after a workout. Thank you for your response either way, so many great comments and information on this thread.

Michelle
Michelle
Reply to  Sumi Fox
1 month ago

I workout on my fast days. I use the fuel from eating the day before.

Maria
Maria
7 months ago

Does adding MCT oil to your coffee break your fast? Thank you.

Maria
Maria
Reply to  John Alexander
7 months ago

That’s good to know. One tablespoon of MCT has kept me full in the past, so I will go ahead and incorporate it into this plan. Thank you so much.

Linda Hamm
Linda Hamm
Reply to  Maria
3 months ago

what is MCT oil?

Susie K
Susie K
1 year ago

Thank you for posting this summary! I have read the book, but having a summary to read through regularly is super useful!

Joyce McGlaun
Joyce McGlaun
1 year ago

I received a diagnosis of DM2 this week. My doc gave me 3 months to regulate with diet and fasting and recommend this book. I read it the same night and started fasting and stopped eating whole grain, regular cooking oats at her recommendation. Does that seem excessive? Is 2-3 times a week too much for steel cut, whole oats, eating them at noon after fasting 18 hours? And thank you so much for your detailed explanations. It is so helpful!

Tom
Tom
1 year ago

I read he only recommends fasting 2 days a week.
Dont think I could fast for 4 days each week!

Matt
Matt
Reply to  John Alexander
10 months ago

The 382 day record fast is impressive, but it’s worth bearing in mind it was followed (some years later) by an early demise (around 50 years old). I’m not sure about causality here but IMHO I also don’t think it’s a good idea to encourage longer fasting without some decent data on health effects.

Jason M
Jason M
1 year ago

Thanks for the summary. Almost done with the book and gearing up for my first fast. My one question is, is sugar free gum during the fast allowed? As a former smoker, I still use sugar free him as a replacement for cigarettes.

Jason M
Jason M
Reply to  John Alexander
1 year ago

Thanks John!

Joan
Joan
Reply to  John Alexander
2 months ago

Hi John!
In your reply, you mention an article about how zero calorie sweeteners adjusted the gut microbiota, but I didn’t see a link. Please reply or email me the link.

Your summary is awesome – have pointed friends to it.

Robin
Robin
1 year ago

Hi John:

Getting ready to start doing the 24 hour fast plan, but I have a question…..I am also trying to get past a life-long tendency to eat most of my calories toward the end of the day (very much psychological). I thought, perhaps I could attempt the 24 hour fast by having the actual meal I eat once a day be lunch, and fasting for breakfast and dinner. Would that work, or would it mess up the timing aspect of the fast?

Heidi
Heidi
1 year ago

This may seem like a silly question but, Does this diet affect smokers in any way?
Do the nicotine cravings constitute as hunger; it seems to subsequently curbs hunger pangs?

Pam
Pam
1 year ago

Hi John,
I just ordered the book. I’m so intrigued by the comments and reviews thus far and I’m confident I’ll be able to handle the meal plan thanks to your summary. However, there’s no mention of alcohol. I read that 2 glasses of wine are acceptable. But what if you have an off day and end up at a party. Are there any recommendations you can offer?
Thanks agai

Bob Keenan
Bob Keenan
1 year ago

Hi, I just finished Fungs’ The Obesity Code, having read Taubes’ Why We Get Fat just prior.

Q: Fung mentions a target of 20-30% of daily calories for protein, but I do not see a target amount for the two other macro-nutrients – fat and carbs (veggies) – is there a target range and can you provide it? Thanks,

Bob

Christina vasquez
Christina vasquez
1 year ago

I have recently had a friend who’s husband lowered his cholesterol by 100 points. I have three stents in my heart and am on medications. Will this diet help me? I am 50 years old 6″2 and rather thin already.

Karl Kessler
Karl Kessler
Reply to  Christina vasquez
1 year ago

Christina, please get a copy of Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn’s “Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease”. The only diet that has proven to reverse atherosclerosis, published in the medical literature, with CT scans confirming, is detailed within. It is NOT expensive, does NOT require supplements and tests. It’s the diet that saved Bill Clinton.

Matt
Matt
Reply to  Christina vasquez
10 months ago

Hi Christina,
In addition to the other advice, it’s worth checking whether you suffer from sleep apnea which is now known to be one cause of atherosclerosis.
I know you said you’re not overweight but slim people can get apnea too 🙂

Jim
Jim
1 year ago

I’ve been reading the book and it sounds interesting. The question I have is does this help much with very obese people? Say like six-foot-two and 550 lb. because I’m wanting to avoid the bariatric surgery but I’m not sure that I’m not too far gone.

Francesca
Francesca
1 year ago

I am in the process of reading the book and find it to be very interesting. My husband is a diabetic and in very good shape but cannot seem to get his sugar down and I have been struggling with the same 10 – 15 lbs for the last 30 years. Would like this to stop. We started with 24 fast right away and was wondering if it is OK to this for 4 days in a row and then 3 days off.

Aileen Drill
Aileen Drill
1 year ago

There is something that bothers me about recommendations, here and elsewhere, to avoid wheat. No one seems to talk about the difference between Heritage wheat, which I use, and the GMO dwarf (Green Revolution) wheat. The explosion in obesity worldwide seems to correlate with the change worldwide to the use of this modified wheat, about 1981. It seems a terrible thing to happen to the Staff of Life. I do not feel well eating GMO wheat, but have no problems with the original.

Carol Phillips
Carol Phillips
1 year ago

Thanks for this summary. I’m currently on Day 6 and down a few pounds. My cravings for sweets is almost gone. Can you eat any rice or potatoes or breakfast cereals?

Lynne Atkinson
Lynne Atkinson
1 year ago

Hi I’m at the end of my second week of this plan, and am finding it so much easier than I thought I would. I actually quite enjoy the fasting, I have increased energy and am totally satisfied when I do eat. The cutting out of sugar and snacking is something I never thought I would manage, but it’s been so simple. One question. We are encouraged to eat natural Greek yoghurt, and I’ve been enjoying it with homemade muesli and a handful of berries for my breakfast. I noticed on the yoghurt carton that it contains sugar however. I’ve… Read more »

Mrs Aarti Joshi
Mrs Aarti Joshi
1 year ago

Hi. He mentioned about 95% diet and 5% exercise. So how much exercise is needed? # of mins per day? # of days a week? I work out 6 days a week, alternate with cardio and weight training.

Aarti Joshi
Aarti Joshi
Reply to  John Alexander
1 year ago

Thank you, yes it is about fat loss. I enjoy working out, but this flexibility makes me feel very relieved and less guilty on missing a day. Now I will be able to reduce the number of days and/or mix it up with yoga, pilates, cardio and weight training.

Canada
Canada
1 year ago

Great summary and great answers to all of the comments – thank you!

Weight loss is my goal,but once the goal is reached and maintained should the fasting every second day be continued or should it end and be something to do every once in awhile? I guess what I am asking is, is the fast now a part of your lifestyle?

Thank you so much!

Canada
Canada
Reply to  John Alexander
1 year ago

Dear John

Thank you for the time you took to throughly reply. It helped a lot. What you said makes sense. I am giving fasting a go and once I get to my goal I will re-read your suggestions and go from there.

You really know what you are talking about. Do you have a science background? You analyze and simply state so much very clearly. It is very much appreciated.

Thank you again.

Canada

Rachel
Rachel
1 year ago

A doctor recommended this book to me, and I read it but this is so helpful. From your understanding, is it important that I fast every other day, or could I start out by picking 2 days each week to do a 24 or 36-hour fast? Thanks!

Chris Cadwallader
Chris Cadwallader
1 year ago

This is great for my partner but not for me my blood suger levels drop when i dont eat any answers for me to use this

Dina
Dina
Reply to  John Alexander
1 year ago

Chris asked exactly what i was going to ask but I don’t see a followup. I can go about 2-4 hours in the morning with just coffee but then I get light headed and ravenous. I really, really want food by that point. I usually eat a protein like a one egg omelet with mushrooms and cheese to tap down the feeling but then it often (not always) triggers even more hunger and I end up doing a bit of a binge. I never eat processed food and rarely sugar, but the fasting beyond a few hours seems to impair… Read more »

Dina
Dina
Reply to  John Alexander
1 year ago

Thanks for the quick response. I have no idea what my blood glucose level is. How do I test that? Sometimes I eat and I feel fine for a 2-3 hours but I often get the urge to snack. I used to keep weight off eating what is basically the Atkins Diet but over the years for environmental reasons I’ve been eating less meat. I still tend to eat tree nuts, apples and proteins (eggs. salmon) to stabile my blood sugar but I’m what most people would call “a grazer” and eat small things frequently. I’ve started doing it thinking… Read more »

Elisabeth
Elisabeth
1 year ago

I reduced my calories to about 1200 cal a day and gained 22 lbs and became prediabetic. It was a shock to me. I felt out of control! After reading Dr Fung’s book, I have lost 23 lbs over a year and now know how to control my weight with intermittent fasting. I am good with when to eat and when not to, but have some confusion about some major food types including dairy, meat, and in-refined carbs. I do want to know if sugar free gum and drinks cause insulin spikes? I still don’t know why I became prediabetic… Read more »

JOSHUA
JOSHUA
1 year ago

Can I still have a post workout protein shake 3 days a week? I have a protein powder called Carnivore that’s made from beef instead of Whey. I’ve also found powders made from bone broth. It’s only after lifting weights which I do 3 days a week.

Diana
Diana
1 year ago

Hi John, just came across your summary is actually pretty good.

Ive read the book.

Thanks

Katie
Katie
1 year ago

Hi I’ve come across your comments and Jason Fung ..iv spent 30 years battling weight and pcos I’m forever tired and stressed… With 2 kids I’m wall falling all the time…plus I’ve spent a small fortune on weight loss classes to loose only to gain twice over… Pcos is my problem I’d say can this diet help and get rid of weight once and for all… I’m so fed up and low over my weight and other pcos problems is it worth buying the book please help

Holly
Holly
Reply to  Katie
1 year ago

There is a Facebook suppport group for people following dr. Fung’s advice. I saw a similar story to yours a few days ago on the support group. Dr fung’s method was working for this fellow pcos sufferer even though nothing else ever had for this person. Good luck!

Anne
Anne
1 year ago

Wow so the way I see it you basically can eat anything but cut back on high carbs and avoid sugary food it’s the fasting that will help you lose weight. After reading what you’ve written it makes me feel better as I can’t have to much fat as it affects my ulcerative colitis (UC) but I have diabetes as well and carbs helps with my UC but not my diabetes but if I can still do some carbs and add protein to support both my health issues it should work. So glad I found you site makes sense now… Read more »