In Jason Fung’s book “The Obesity Code”, he outines two example methods of fasting; 24 hour & 36 hour fasts. Below are printable sample meal plans for those time periods. Each version has pre-progammed example meals + empty versions that allow you to program in your own meals.

Whilst what you eat inbetween fasts is of course crucial, assuming that you make your diet relatively healthy, the core component to focus on is adherance to the fasting periods of the diet plan. These are where your blood glucose and insulin will decrease, allowing your body to burn  its fat stores. Resulting in gradual weight loss.

Sample 7-Day Meal Plan – 24-hour Fasting Protocol – Click to open printable PDF

Sample 7-Day Meal Plan – 24-hour Fasting Protocol – with Blanks – Click to open printable PDF

Sample 7-Day Meal Plan – 36-hour Fasting Protocol – Click to open printable PDF

 

Sample 7-Day Meal Plan – 36-hour Fasting Protocol – with Blanks – Click to open printable PDF

Alex

Posted by Alex

15 Comments

  1. Hi Alex.
    I am diabetic for couple of years can this fasting suit me?
    Haruni

    Reply

    1. Alex

      Hi Haruni. Certainly diabetes can complicate dietary interventions such as fasting. For example, if it’s type 1 diabetes (or type 2 and you take insulin), then you may need to adjust your insulin dosage when fasting. You can imagine that if you’re not consuming food, you don’t need the normal insulin load to clear the glucose from the blood (because you haven’t consumed anything to cause a glucose spike). If you took insulin in that scenario it could make you hypoglycemic, which is dangerous.

      If it’s type 2 diabetes (and you’re not taking insulin), then that makes things a bit simpler. But you would still need to consider the effect of any medication you’re on.

      You’ll need to run the fasting past your doctor and see what they say – they will have access to your medical history & current medication, which allows them to give informed advice.

      But in terms of the question – is it possible that fasting can help with diabetes? For type 2 diabetes that doesn’t require exogenous insulin, then the reserach is looking positive. For diabetes reuqiring insulin, then fasting can be potentially dangerous, and should only be embarked upon with the support and guidance of your doctor.

      Type 2 diabetes is a situation where your cells can’t absorb anymore glucose (which would normally be shunted in there by insulin). Then your body tries harder (increases insulin), and you end up with two problems; elevated blood glucose (because it’s not being cleared successfully from the bloodstream) and elevated insulin.

      If you fast, you reduce the external sources of glucose, allowing your body to use its internal glucose. If you repeat this process, you gradually increase your insulin sensitivity again.

      Hopefully there’s a nugget or two in there that helps. But yes, do consult with your doctor first.

      Reply

      1. Hi Doc,

        I am 5ft8 and just 64kg. I am a type 2 diabetic, and been so for about 5 years. I am on Insulin now. I am having to Insulin (slow acting) once at night and (rapid acting) 3 times day.

        I have been told that my pancreas are not functioning and not producing Insulin.

        Will this program work for me?

        Reply

        1. Alex

          Hi Mizan.

          In short, fasting could be dangerous for you (and anyone else taking insulin), and you must speak to your doctor to get his advice and approval.

          Longer answer…

          Firstly, to clarify, I’m not a doctor – if you’re referring to Dr Jason Fung, you’ll be able to reach him at his website.

          With regards to diabetes that requires insulin injections, you absolutely need to seek advice from a doctor with regards to fasting. We need to touch on how insulin and glucose relate in order to understand why. When you inject the insulin, it triggers your body to lower blood glucose. That’s okay when you’re been eating regularly, and perhaps have elevated blood glucose. But imagine now the scenario where you fast, and your blood glucose is already low. If you then inject insulin, you risk reducing glucose to levels that are too low, and becoming hypoglycemic. This is dangerous, and at an extreme could result in coma and death.

          To adapt the insulin injections around fasting, would require you to monitor your blood glucose very carefully, and avoid injecting insulin when your blood glucose is at, or below, a healthy limit. That sounds simple enough, but there could be further complicating factors.

          This type of advice should not be gathered over the internet, and instead requires consulting with a doctor who understands more about the treatment you’re on, and any other medical issues to take into consideration.

          Hope that helps guide you in the right direction.

          Reply

  2. Dessert -not “Desert”

    Reply

    1. Alex

      Thanks Molly, good spot! I’ll change that when I get a moment.

      Reply

  3. Im wondering if a multi vitamin is ok at any time

    Reply

    1. Alex

      Hi Tracy.

      Yes, you can take a multivitamin at any time. Personally, I prefer to avoid taking multivitamins on an empty stomach, as it doesn’t feel so good (for me). I generally only take them with meals. So in practice that means I don’t take multivitamins whilst fasting – but that’s just a personal preference.

      Reply

  4. Hi!
    I am doing the 7 day fasting, no food, can i have cream in my coffee? Half and half?
    Thank you!
    Liliana

    Reply

    1. Alex

      Hi Liliana. Of course, ideally you avoid coffee + cream whilst doing your fast. But, if that’s not an option, then yeah – absolutely, go for it with the coffee + cream. You will still attain many of the sought after benefits.

      The fact that the FMD diet works, where participants consume calories for 5 days, suggests that going zero calories is not absolutely necessary.

      Reply

  5. Hi Alex,
    I have 3 of JF’s eBooks. Thank you for making the plans so easy to print out. 🙂

    Reply

    1. Alex

      Hi Tina, thanks for the message. Glad you found it helpful!

      Reply

  6. Hi Alex,
    What are the times to eat Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner? And how many hours do I have to wait between meals? I tend to eat very late in the morning (about 11ish). So if 11 is Breakfast, how long do I wait until “lunch” and then “dinner”? I’m only on Page 50 of the book but would love to get into this routine asap using your helpful guide.

    Reply

    1. Alex

      Hi Elizabeth, thanks for your message.

      With regards to meal timings, I believe they can be flexible. The core thing to focus on is the fasting length, and making sure that from your last bite in the evening, to the next bite 24-36 hours later, you are fasting.

      Other than that, it won’t make a huge difference if you have your meals at 9am, 1pm & 7pm… or indeed you squeeze 3 meals into the space of just a couple of hours. As long as your fasting period is upheld.

      Reply

  7. Carole Sanders August 8, 2018 at 2:41 pm

    I am going to hoestly try your trustworthy advice, at 69 I’m told it’s not to late.
    Thank You

    Reply

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